Compassion dogs provide veterans with a living, breathing lifeline to the outside world.

Compassion dogs provide veterans with a living, breathing lifeline to the outside world.

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Our Dogs

Like any good partnership, chemistry counts. Our dogs are young,
rescued or repurposed, and carefully matched to their veteran.

Our rescue dogs have come from BCSPCA Alberni-Clayoquot (Port Alberni).
Our repurpose dogs have been donated from BC and Alberta Guide Dogs (BCGDS) and Pacific Assistance Dogs (PADS).

All our dogs have had been temperament tested, Have had their eyes, hips, and elbow certified.
They are spayed or neutered and vaccinated. Learn more about applying to our program.

Our dogs learn to be emotionally tuned
to their person and their unique triggers.
Below are some etiquette tips to
remember the next time you encounter
a service dog.

The bond created through each team is life altering. Our dogs learn to be emotionally tuned to their person and their unique triggers. They’re able to wake veterans from nightmares, ground them from a hyper-aroused state, and support them unconditionally through the stresses and trauma of everyday life. Service Dogs are not pets, they are working dogs and have had significant training to provide the veteran with assistance when required.

When you meet a service dog…

1. Should I ever pet a Service Dog?

NO. You may ask, but please be considerate that the handler likely is stopped 100’s of times a trip and probably just wants to buy their groceries and go home.

1. Should I ever pet a Service Dog?

NO. You may ask, but please be considerate that the handler likely is stopped 100’s of times a trip and probably just wants to buy their groceries and go home.

2. Should I make kiss noises (or address) the Service Dog in any way?

NO. Please don’t distract a working dog.
It can be very dangerous and has a 100% rate of being obnoxious.

2. Should I make kiss noises (or address) the Service Dog in any way?

NO. Please don’t distract a working dog.
It can be very dangerous and has a 100% rate of being obnoxious.

3. But what if the dog is super-cute / I love dogs? Still NO.

3. But what if the dog is super-cute / I love dogs? Still NO.

2. Should I ask the handler what their disability is?

NO. Or only if you’d care to share your personal medical information as well.
You could ask about the dog’s task instead.

2. Should I ask the handler what their disability is?

NO. Or only if you’d care to share your personal medical information as well.
You could ask about the dog’s task instead.

The Bottom Line

Please just let the Service Dog work. They have an incredibly important job to do
and if they are distracted, their handler could get hurt. We get that you’re curious, but that doesn’t mean we don’t enjoy privacy, or common courtesies that people without service animals are given.
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